A History of Pictures for Children

A History of Pictures for Children
David Hockney and Martin Gayford, illustrated by Rose Blake
Thames & Hudson

It’s great to see so many art books for children published in recent months particularly since the creative subjects – art in particular – are being side-lined in the curriculum; a ridiculously short-sighted act I believe. We need to foster, nurture and develop children’s creativity rather than stifling it. Being able to think outside the box, to say, ‘what if ? …’ is the root of all development including scientific and technical. The current tick-box mentality and constant testing of children does absolutely nothing for their true development; hoop-jumpers are not what is desirable at all.
Hurrah then for such books as this.

Essentially it is a totally enthralling and immersive conversation between artist Hockney and art critic Gayford, wherein through eight chapters they look at, discuss and ponder upon works of art, providing a condensed history of art that encompasses Hockney’s art, those who influenced his works and some awesome work from others through the ages.

Rose Blake provides terrific additional illustrations of her own that cleverly bring the whole enterprise together.

I opened the parcel containing my review copy the day before I was leaving for 3 weeks in India so I tucked it into my laptop bag to take with me. I showed it to my friend Shahid Parvez, an artist and assistant Professor in the Department of Visual Arts, at Mohanlal Sukhadia University – Udaipur.
He also shared it with his artistic 11-year-old daughter Saba.
Here in brief are their comments:
Shahid: ‘What a lovely book – very readable and absorbing. It certainly makes you curious to know more about art and you don’t want to put it down until the end. I wish we had books such as this one in India to give our kids exposure to art in such an interesting, easy to understand way.

Saba: ‘Such an interesting book telling me about art history and the different aspects of art. I specially liked the “Light and Shadows’

and ‘Mirrors and Reflections’ chapters

and the Timeline of Inventions. I would love to read more books like this one.’

Altogether an excellent enterprise that will assuredly engage and excite both young readers and adults.

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