The Worst Sleepover in the World

The Worst Sleepover in the World
Sophie Dahl and Luciano Lozano
Walker Books

Seven year old Ramona eagerly anticipates her first ever sleepover when her friend Gracie is coming to stay the night. The plan is Ramona, Gracie and Ramona’s younger sister Ruby would all sleep in the one bedroom and they’d feast at midnight on such goodies as ice-cream sundaes, chocolate buttons, pizza, doughnuts and more. But when Mum gets to hear what the sisters intend, she steps in stipulating crisps, sandwiches and popcorn. Nonetheless the sisters are super-excited and sure they’re about to host ‘the best sleepover in history’.

However when Gracie arrives announcing that she’s ‘quite fussy’, it seems things are not going to go according to plan. Gracie hates all the food she’s offered at tea time, bath time is a damp squib and then when it’s time to pack the lunchboxes for that feast, Gracie again dislikes all the food and turns her nose up at the replacements.

The sleeping arrangements are not to her liking either, and nor is the family’s stinky dog. Is there any possibility that Ramona’s mum can step in, draw on her inner resources and save the day or rather night? Moreover can she do it without upsetting her own elder daughter? And will the girls still be friends in the morning?

Definitely this is a story – a longish one for a picture book – that youngsters can relate to. Sophie Dahl’s first person telling provides lots of details about Ramona and her life, all of which we see through the young narrator’s own eyes while Luciano Lozano’s vibrant illustrations speak volumes too as they show the different events of the evening, night and following morning and both the children’s and Mum’s reactions to them. Indeed there’s lots to explore at every turn of the page.

Vive la difference! is the message that emerges strongly from this fun book.

Madame Badobedah / A Sea of Stories / Zippel: The Little Keyhole Ghost

Madame Badobedah
Sophie Dahl and Lauren O’Hara
Walker Books

This is a rather longer than usual picture book story of an unusual older woman and the young narrator, Mabel.

Mabel lives at The Mermaid Hotel an establishment managed by her parents. She’s an only child with a fertile imagination and a thirst for adventure and here she acts as narrator of the tale of what happens when a certain rather unusual guest arrives. Not only does the woman have twenty-three bags, two large trunks, lots of jewels and a dressing table but also two cats, two dogs and a tortoise, oh! and a penchant for toffees too.

So high-handed is her manner that Mabel takes an instant dislike to her, naming her Madame Badobedah and deciding she’s a villain. Donning her large raincoat, hat and sunglasses the girl becomes Mabel the Spy.

One Saturday morning the strange guest invites Mabel into her room for tea.

We learn that Madame Badobedah had long ago come across the sea on a big ship to escape war and had once been a ballerina – hence the jewelled tiara.

Gradually as this rather unlikely friendship blossoms we learn more about Madame Badobedah – she’s ready to apologise when she thinks it’s due, enjoys visiting the mermaids,

and also has some secrets that she wants to keep to herself. I love the way Sophie Dahl’s narrative gradually reveals things about the lonely Irena (as we discover is her real name) but leaves plenty of gaps for readers to fill in for themselves.

Lauren O’Hara captures the inherent warmth of the story in her deliciously whimsical illustrations that are just perfect for the quirky telling.

Another story about an intergenerational friendship is:

A Sea of Stories
Sylvia Bishop, illustrated by Paddy Donnelly
Stripes Publishing

Young Roo loves to visit her grandpa who lives in a cottage beside the sea with Bathsheba, his ancient cat and a large collection of Bits-and-Pieces he’s accumulated over the years.

Grandpa has a garden that has become overgrown and wild, the ideal place for a game of hide-and-seek when she goes to stay for a few days. When he gets tired there’s nothing he likes better than to sit in his favourite armchair and tell stories to Roo; stories inspired by the objects in his collection.

They all relate to the hidden cove at the bottom of the cliff, a place that Grandpa’s legs won’t carry him to any longer on account of the ‘rambly-scrambly path’ that leads down there.

On her final night at Grandpa’s Roo turns her wish for a way to bring Grandpa and his favourite cove back together into a plan; a plan that the following day is brought to fruition.

Highlighting the importance of sharing stories, this unusual story is both warm and infused with a delightful quirkiness.

Zippel: The Little Keyhole Ghost
Alex Rühle, trans. Rachel Ward, illustrated by Axel Scheffler
Andersen Press

One day after the holidays Paul returns home from school and gets the surprise of his life: a voice comes from the keyhole when he inserts his key and it turns out to be a tiny ghost claiming he lives in the keyhole.

He names the being Zippel; but later on that same day he learns that the lock on the front door is to be replaced in just three days.

Later that evening Paul’s parents leave him alone and go to a meeting. Immediately the lad informs Zippel and the race is on to find the enormously inquisitive ghost (with an interest in everything including toilets) a new home before the three days are out.

With smashing Axel Scheffler colour illustrations and absolutely full of delicious wordplay and puns, not to mention Zippel’s rhymes, this warm-hearted story about discovering friends in the strangest of places is fun around Halloween especially, but worth reading any time.